LA Undercover Film Review

Film Review By #MatthewSawyer

3/5

Corey Shaw played by our writer, director, and all-around talent Omar Cook is a fresh and exciting addition to the LAPD in his new film “LA Undercover”. Just as Shaw is about to go undercover he finds out his girlfriend Serria played by Queen Ajima is pregnant, adding a lot of tension to the film. As crime rates in LA skyrocket, Shaw is thrown into a dangerous undercover operation to take down the ruthless crime lord, Kevin “Keys” Lyles. The film expertly navigates the tension and pressures of Shaw’s double life, as he struggles to maintain relationships, fulfill his duties as a cop, and stay true to his own identity. 

 

The story is well-crafted and keeps the audience engaged throughout the entire film, with plot twists and turns that are both unexpected and satisfying. The film also delves into the complexities of being a cop and the moral dilemmas that come with the job. It explores the themes of identity, loyalty and the blurred line between good and evil. The screenplay is well-written and the pacing is just right, making for a film that is both thrilling and thought-provoking. LA undercover Poster

 

The performances in the film are top-notch, particularly from the lead actor who perfectly captures the nuances of Shaw’s character. He brings a sense of vulnerability and humanity to the role that makes the audience root for him throughout the film. The villain, Kevin “Keys” Lyles, played by another accomplished actor, is equally impressive. He is terrifying and menacing, and his performance adds depth to the film. 

 

The production design, cinematography, and score all contribute to the overall atmosphere of the film. The gritty and realistic portrayal of LA adds to the tension of the film and immerses the audience in the story. Some people might argue that the film ends rather abruptly however, I found it just left me wanting more. 

 

Cook and his partner in crime Armstrong (co-writer and director) seem to be creating a great team with original and independent films and I feel it won’t be long until they are given a chance with a bigger budget and I for one, can’t wait to watch.

Film Review By #MatthewSawyer

3/5

Corey Shaw played by our writer, director, and all-around talent Omar Cook is a fresh and exciting addition to the LAPD in his new film “LA Undercover”. Just as Shaw is about to go undercover he finds out his girlfriend Serria played by Queen Ajima is pregnant, adding a lot of tension to the film. As crime rates in LA skyrocket, Shaw is thrown into a dangerous undercover operation to take down the ruthless crime lord, Kevin “Keys” Lyles. The film expertly navigates the tension and pressures of Shaw’s double life, as he struggles to maintain relationships, fulfill his duties as a cop, and stay true to his own identity. 

 

The story is well-crafted and keeps the audience engaged throughout the entire film, with plot twists and turns that are both unexpected and satisfying. The film also delves into the complexities of being a cop and the moral dilemmas that come with the job. It explores the themes of identity, loyalty and the blurred line between good and evil. The screenplay is well-written and the pacing is just right, making for a film that is both thrilling and thought-provoking. LA undercover Poster

 

The performances in the film are top-notch, particularly from the lead actor who perfectly captures the nuances of Shaw’s character. He brings a sense of vulnerability and humanity to the role that makes the audience root for him throughout the film. The villain, Kevin “Keys” Lyles, played by another accomplished actor, is equally impressive. He is terrifying and menacing, and his performance adds depth to the film. 

 

The production design, cinematography, and score all contribute to the overall atmosphere of the film. The gritty and realistic portrayal of LA adds to the tension of the film and immerses the audience in the story. Some people might argue that the film ends rather abruptly however, I found it just left me wanting more. 

Cook and his partner in crime Armstrong (co-writer and director) seem to be creating a great team with original and independent films and I feel it won’t be long until they are given a chance with a bigger budget and I for one, can’t wait to watch.